Scendiletto puff pastry and custard dessert from Pasticceria Stefania in Florence

Golossary: Scendiletto

One has to live in an Italian home to truly appreciate the name of this delicious but difficult to find dessert. The poor nomenclature might have something to do with its lack of popularity; by all accounts it should fly off the shelves. It is essentially a custard sandwich, with creamy, sweet custard with rich egg flavor, baked between two thin crisp layers of buttery … Continue reading Golossary: Scendiletto

Golossary: Granita

Italian for slushy, but so much better! Theory is that the Arabs brought this sweet icy concoction to Sicily where they mixed their flavored syrups with the snow and ice of Etna and without a doubt, Sicily still has the best granita to be found. Paired with brioche, it makes a typical summer breakfast both cool and refreshing, and appealing in the hot Sicilian summer. … Continue reading Golossary: Granita

Golossary: Agnello Pasquale

A very sweet Sicilian Easter tradition, the Agnello Pasquale (Easter Lamb) is an impressive beauty to behold. Sweet almond marzipan is sculpted into the shape of a lamb, a symbol of Christ and Easter. The lamb may be filled or decorated, variations abound. Often the lamb is decorated with a pure white crisp sugar or meringue coating to resemble its wooly coat. Fillings vary, but … Continue reading Golossary: Agnello Pasquale

Golossary: Colomba

Colomba is the Easter Panettone. It gets its name from its dove shape, the symbol of peace. Like panettone, it is a rich egg bread, tall and yeasty, and in the best cases, incredibly light in texture. The bread should pull apart easily in thick chunks, with large air pockets trapped inside. Like Panettone, the Colomba traditionally contains candied fruit, but the top is crusted … Continue reading Golossary: Colomba

Golossary: Cenci

Cenci, Chiacchere, Crostoli, etc. – What’s in a name? These carnival treats go by a different name in every town. They may be called cenci in Florence, but chiacchere elsewhere. Chiacchere is one of the more common names and a particularly evocative one. “Chiacchere” is to chat or chatter, and the name comes from the sound of the pastry bubbling in the hot oil. Lucca … Continue reading Golossary: Cenci